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How to Help a Loved One Who is Grieving During the Holiday

Published: December 1, 2022

Christmas is a time of joy and happiness, but for some people it can be a difficult time. This is especially true for those who are grieving the loss of a loved one.

The holidays can be overwhelming and depressing, and people often feel isolated and alone.

What to say and what not to say to someone who is grieving

There are things you can say to someone who is grieving during Christmas that will help them feel supported and loved.

Start the conversation with "I'm here for you".

This is one of the most important things you can say to someone who is grieving during the holidays. It shows that you care and are willing to be there for them if they need support.

Tell them that it's ok to grieve in whatever way they need to. This might mean skipping holiday parties or taking a break from decorating the Christmas tree and letting them know that their decisions are being respected and understood.

Ask them if there is anything you can do for them, whether it’s running errands or simply lending a listening ear.

DON'T try to minimize their grief or tell them that things will get better soon. This can come across as dismissive and invalidating, which will only cause them more pain and frustration during what is already a very difficult time of year.

Overall, being there for someone who is grieving during Christmas can make a huge difference in their experience and help them to feel loved and supported. If you know someone who is struggling with grief this holiday season, remember that they need you now more than ever – so be there for them as best you can.

What they want you to know

1.Social situations are hard

Remember that they are still grieving the loss of their loved one, and this process will take time. Don't expect them to simply "move on" or act like everything is fine overnight.

It's also important to listen without trying to fix things or offer advice. Simply being there for them and offering a supportive presence can go a long way towards helping them feel supported during this difficult time.

2. Even during the happiest of times, they are still aware that someone is missing from the celebration

That feeling of emptiness can make it difficult to enjoy the holidays and feel truly happy. And even though they might be laughing and celebrating and enjoying many moments, that deep sense of missing their loved ones can sometimes overshadow the joy of the season.

Don't try to "take away" their grief by insisting that they should be happy or change how they are feeling.

Instead, acknowledge their pain and listen to them without trying to fix things or tell them what they should do. Sometimes just having someone there who understands is all that a grieving person needs during the holidays.

3. It's ok to talk about their loved one

And they want you to! Many of us shy away from having conversations or talking about their loved ones because we don't want to upset the grieving person or make them feel worse.

But when someone is experiencing grief, openly talking about their loved one can be a huge comfort and help to keep their memory alive. Whether it's sharing happy memories, exchanging stories about how they were as a person, or simply saying their name out loud, remembering and honoring the lost loved one is an important part of the healing process.

The holidays can be a difficult time for those who are grieving the loss of a loved one. However, with some understanding and support, they can still enjoy many moments of happiness and joy. If you know someone who is grieving during the holiday season, remember that they need you now more than ever – so be there for them as best you can.

If you know someone that is grieving the loss of a loved one or if you are grieving yourself, Roupp Funeral Home offers a variety of Grief Support programs. Head over to www.rouppfuneralhome.com to learn more.


 
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